This Commission has been set up to improve the welfare of the disadvantaged, marginalized and deprived sections in Punjab and achieve good Governance based on high ethical standards. The motivation for the Commission comes from the fact that the present system of governance is not optimally suited to the challenges of unequal access of social programs and skewed distribution of benefits of the various economic programs based on gender, caste and class. The mandate of the Commission is to suggest changes in the process, procedures, rules regulations and design of the public services, ensure dignified access of these services to the disadvantage, marginalized; and deprived sections of society including women.


PGRC - I : CONSTITUTION OF COMMISSION
  • Constituted in 2009, PGRC has completed two and a half years of its tenure.
COMPOSITION OF THE COMMISSION
  • Chairperson Dr. Pramod Kumar
MEMBER
  • Prof. Dipankar Gupta, Prof. Atul Sood, Sh. R.N. Gupta and Ms. Satwant Reddy, retired civil servants. The task groups are chaired by Justice (Retd.) K.S. Grewal, Sh. J.R. Kundal, IAS (Retd), Prof. S.L. Sharma, Prof. B.S. Ghuman, Prof. H.S. Mehta and Mr. M.P.S. Aulakh.
OFFICERS OF THE COMMISSION
  • Sh. Satish Chandra Member Secretary
  • Sh. Rakesh Verma Secretary

PGRC - II : CONSTITUTION OF SECOND PGRC IN 2012

COMPOSITION OF THE COMMISSION
  • Chairperson Dr. Pramod Kumar
MEMBERS
  • Prof. Dipankar Gupta, Prof. K.K. Talwar, Prof. Atul Sood, Sh. R.N. Gupta and Mr. J.R. Kundal. The task groups are chaired by Mr. R.N. Gupta, Mr. J.R. Kundal, Prof. K.K. Talwar, Justice K.S. Grewal (Retd.), Mr. Rajinder Gupta, Prof. Atul Sood, Dr. A.A. Siddiqui and Mr. Anil Malhotra.
OFFICERS OF THE COMMISSION
  • Sh. Satish Chandra Member Secretary
  • Dr. G. Vajralingam Member Secretary

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMMISSION
Organisational Chart

APPROACH
  • Reports were prepared periodically by the Commission and the Government prepared action-taken reports simultaneously.
  • Task groups set up for specialised functions. Task group had a Chairperson nominated by the Commission and a Member Secretary appointed by the Government.
  • Chief Secretary’s Empowered Committee constituted exclusively to deal with the recommendations only.
  • Empowered Committee to prepare an action-taken report and submit it to the Commission in a time bound manner.
  • Interface with stakeholders, regulators, functionaries and citizens.

CONCERNS
  • Firstly, the Commission decided to position itself on the side of the citizens. The quality and cost factors emerging from delivery policy particularly for citizens with identical needs was one of the main concerns.
  • Secondly, task groups were constituted to analyse issues to prioritise and identify the governance re-engineering approach including amendments in procedures and rules.
  • Thirdly, these task groups documented non-statutory and discriminatory powers leading to redefining and re-allocation of roles.
  • Fourthly, these recommendations were finalised in consultation with the political class to invoke political will for speedy implementation through a process of institutionalisation and enhancement of personnel capacities as per citizens needs. Efforts were made to arrive at a reasonable assessment of resources, trust and technology deficits.

BOUNDARY CONDITIONS FOR ENGAGED GOVERNANCE
  • Engaged governance means ‘politically more engaging and developmentally more equitable’. Enabling conditions to achieve this was to empower citizens. To put in the words Hannah Arendt, Right to have Rights.
  • The Commission was guided by four broad boundary conditions.
  • To reduce the mistrust between the citizens and the government.
  • Secondly to protect dignity of citizens by identifying spaces, policies, processes and practices which perpetuate undignified exchange between the citizens and the state.
  • A third set of prerequisites relates to the productivity, i.e. to engage people with the system in a productive manner.
  • The fourth boundary conditions was to transform these claims relating to exchange between the citizens and the public functionaries from patron-client or Ria Mai Baap to Public Servants–citizen partnership, the Commission proposed to empower the citizens through a legislation titled ‘Punjab Right to Services Act, 2011’.

ACCOUNTABLE ADMINISTRATION. WHY RIGHT TO SERVICE ACT?
Sixty-four years after independence
  • Citizens were not trusted by the government.
  • Services were provided as doles or khirat. And citizens were treated like Ria and administration as Mai Baap.
  • Bribes and corruption became rampant and blatant
  • No institutional system of complaint redressal.


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